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NHL's Lack of Major Rule Changes

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    We got a few minor changes to the NHL rule book for the 2018-2019 season, but none that most were hoping for. No changes to the offside rule (which I didn't expect) and also no changes to how they handle late hits (which I definitely expected).

    They did update the rule on awarding goals. That part in parenthesis is the change, mainly the 'would have' aspect:

    A goal will be awarded to the attacking team when the opposing team has taken their goalkeeper off the ice and an attacking player has possession and control of the puck (or would have gained possession and control) in the neutral or attacking zone, without a defending player between himself and the opposing goal, and he is prevented from scoring as a result of an infraction committed by the defending team.


    They also slightly updated goalkeeper equipment regulations. Taller goalkeepers can now request longer paddles. And they added 'torso padding' requirements. Also more specified rules to elbow padding and clavicle protectors, etc etc.

    Boring stuff really.

    Where are the major changes, like we routinely see in the NFL now? Lots of people were hoping for a change to Coach's Challenge calls. Then there's the two changes I mentioned above: offside rules and late hits. When do you think the league will address these?

    Any other major changes you're expecting in the coming years?

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    So I'm confused now reading this and looking into it a little. I don't know much about hockey rules.. so coaches can challenge offsides? How does that work? Why don't they just leave that up to some refs upstairs? Can they only challenge a certain amount of times like the NFL?
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    Dallasite Wrote: So I'm confused now reading this and looking into it a little. I don't know much about hockey rules.. so coaches can challenge offsides? How does that work? Why don't they just leave that up to some refs upstairs? Can they only challenge a certain amount of times like the NFL?

    It really all depends on if there's a goal scored. For instance, the only 2 instances where a coach can challenge is if he feels the goalie was interfered with during a successful goal, or if he think there was offsides during a successful goal.

    Though it's exactly like the NFL regarding timeouts. They can only challenge (*only* for one of the two situations above) if they have a timeout remaining. If they lose the challenge, they lose the timeout. If they win, the retain it.

    As for the other changes that need to happen, I don't see them happening anytime soon. The NHL is able to stick to their was, at least in the states, so much more than the NFL. It's not as prominent as the NFL and that gives them more freedom to do so, I think.

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    PowerPlay Wrote:
    Dallasite Wrote: So I'm confused now reading this and looking into it a little. I don't know much about hockey rules.. so coaches can challenge offsides? How does that work? Why don't they just leave that up to some refs upstairs? Can they only challenge a certain amount of times like the NFL?

    It really all depends on if there's a goal scored. For instance, the only 2 instances where a coach can challenge is if he feels the goalie was interfered with during a successful goal, or if he think there was offsides during a successful goal.

    Though it's exactly like the NFL regarding timeouts. They can only challenge (*only* for one of the two situations above) if they have a timeout remaining. If they lose the challenge, they lose the timeout. If they win, the retain it.

    Interesting. That makes a lot more sense now, thanks for that. So do you think it should be changed? Or do you like the added element to the game? Its fairly new right, like just started a few years ago?
Categories: NHL Hockey