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College Basketball Losing Its Appeal to NBA Prospects

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    Times, they may be a-changing for College Basketball. NBA prospects fresh out of high school, as well as those who are already in college are considering alternative routes to the NBA. To top it off, the NBA's one-and-done rule is expected to get phased out in 2022. Which this means that high school players will no longer have to spend at least one year in college before leaving and entering the draft. Not to mention, the NBA's G League(NBA's development league) offers elite high school players an alternative route that pays.

    A quote from an article I found on the subject:

    "Elite high school prospects for years have elected to sign with college programs, fulfilling their NBA Draft requirements by being one season removed from high school in order to become draft eligible. This new route, however, would allow those prospects to cash in -- most importantly, legally -- while providing a path to becoming a pro in the NBA's developmental system."

    Also take into consideration some high school players are skipping it altogether and choosing to play pro ball in other countries.

    To put it into perspective, when the NCAA tournament starts in March, three of the top American Draft prospects won't be in it. James Wiseman left Memphis after receiving a 12 game suspension due to a controversy with Penny Hardaway, and will hire agent and prepare for the 2020 NBA Draft instead. R.J. Hampton, and LaMelo Ball chose to play in Australia's National Basketball league.

    If the One-and-Done rule is phased out, this sort of thing could really pick up speed, and possibly harm College Basketball. I think giving high school prospects alternative paths to the NBA is a good thing. The only thing College Basketball can give these players that the others can't is an education and an extensive alumni network. Not to mention College ball gives many players the exposure they need.

    Yet, we are now in the day of the "self starter". Many people successfully promote themselves using social media these days. An athlete's brand is built on social media more often than not these days as well.

    Where does everyone else fall on this subject? What other benefits does College Basketball provide to young players?

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    JFoster Wrote:

    Where does everyone else fall on this subject? What other benefits does College Basketball provide to young players?

    College ball was thought of as the only developmental route to the NBA for a long time. But you're 100% right, all this is changing. March Madness will be watered down because of it and the NBA draft will be harder to follow but I think this is a good thing for both those looking to get into the NBA through other routes and for those looking to get attention from NBA scouts while getting an education. A win win for the players and the NBA isn't really affected that much. Just kind of hurts the NCAA, but I have no sympathy for them and there is definitely no love lost between the unpaid college basketball stars and the NCAA.
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    joetemple Wrote:
    Just kind of hurts the NCAA, but I have no sympathy for them and there is definitely no love lost between the unpaid college basketball stars and the NCAA.
    That definitely brings up another good point. We also have to consider how much the NCAA makes off of their players who are not paid(at least legally) for playing.