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Tour de France Begins With Strict Conditions

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    The Tour de France is finally underway after recent events caused it to postpone it's initial dates of June 27th through July 19th. The race has now officially begun and is running from August 30th through September 20th. With everything that's been going on recently you'd expect there to be some pretty heavy changes happening for the competitors, staff and viewers.

    Not only are there much fewer fans allowed to spectate in person, but those that are there are only allowed in certain areas and must stay a certain distance from each other. Also much like with the NBA and other sports, the Tour de France is in somewhat of a bubble. Another major change this year is that all 176 riders and staff have daily health screenings and mandatory daily testing from a mobile lab. The main point of note here is that if two or more people test positive on any team, that entire team will be removed from the race.

    This has come with a bit of controversy, as some of the riders have already had this happen. The main issue here is the UCI (governing body for the Tour de France) originally had rules allowing the organizers themselves to decide whether an entire team gets removed or not. Now the French authorities stepped in and changed it to the 2-or-more rule. This lead to some issues such as the four members of the Belgium Lotto-Soudal team testing positive and were removed after "non-negative" tests. Though the entire team didn't get sent home (yet) due to the changes hadn't been implemented by French authorities at that point.

    Although I hate to say it, I think it's a decent decision to expel a team that has two positive tests. Those two people can spread whatever they have like wildfire. There's just no way to guarantee that it doesn't reach other staff members or the riders themselves. It's bittersweet, but I think it's the right call. On the other hand, it would be a shame to send people home for faulty tests or those that were not affected at all.

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    Yup, rock and a hard place. Its the right call even though there will be instances that are unfortunate. So if you miss time in the Tour de France, it's basically over right? I don't exactly understand the rules. I know they race in stages so was wondering if there was any reason to miss a few days and still try and get back in?
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    Dallasite Wrote: Yup, rock and a hard place. Its the right call even though there will be instances that are unfortunate. So if you miss time in the Tour de France, it's basically over right? I don't exactly understand the rules. I know they race in stages so was wondering if there was any reason to miss a few days and still try and get back in?

    As far as I understand, yes. If you miss an event you're basically done. I do know that the teams being sent home are now sent home for good though. Meaning, if they test any other way than negative they're out of the race.