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  • Sep 05, 2020 04:36 PM
    Last: 18d
    450
    joetemple Wrote:
    PowerPlay Wrote:

    Am I missing something here?

    Its because of the location. Churchill Downs, the race site for the Derby, is in Louisville. So was the shooting of Breonna Taylor. And its nationally televised so really it makes a lot of sense for protesters to gather for this event. I'm wondering what happens just before, during and after the race. And into the night. Hopefully it remains peaceful and relatively civil, but hard to see that happening with how many of the protesters on both sides are armed.

    That makes much more sense. But even still, I don't know if this was the right place to do this. Yeah, it brought more attention to the issue which is a good thing. But it also got bogged down by the "other side" showing up.

    I don't know. Something about it just feels off. I totally agree with the statement, I just don't know if the Kentucky Derby is the place to do it.

  • Sep 04, 2020 05:08 PM
    Last: 17d
    191

    I personally chalk it up to Ron Rivera being a meh coach. I just don't think he has what it takes to put together and keep a great team like say, Andy Reid or Bill Belichick. I'm not sure why everyone in NC loved him so much.

    This being his first year in Washington I'd think he wouldn't make a decision like this so soon, especially with someone like Adrian Peterson.

  • Aug 30, 2020 06:30 PM
    Last: 18d
    359
    Dallasite Wrote: Yup, rock and a hard place. Its the right call even though there will be instances that are unfortunate. So if you miss time in the Tour de France, it's basically over right? I don't exactly understand the rules. I know they race in stages so was wondering if there was any reason to miss a few days and still try and get back in?

    As far as I understand, yes. If you miss an event you're basically done. I do know that the teams being sent home are now sent home for good though. Meaning, if they test any other way than negative they're out of the race.

  • Sep 05, 2020 04:36 PM
    Last: 18d
    450

    This year's Kentucky Derby will probably go down as one of, if not the strangest one in history. First of all, the event has no fans in the stands this year. Recent events caused the Derby (usually scheduled in May) to be postponed until this Saturday with all new regulations in mind, atleast for the time being. That means no in-person spectators and special guidelines for the racers and their teams.

    But believe it or not, that's not the only thing causing issues at this year's Derby. The 101st installment of the Derby was met with demonstrators demanding justice for Breonna Taylor. Along with them were armed counter-protesters saying there side. The two groups met with chanting and some yelling from both sides, though as of yet there have been no injuries or altercations to speak of. The protests from both sides, though a bit intense, were not aggressive. The protests ended with riot geared police breaking up the crowds.

    Now with that being said, I'm a bit confused here. Why of all places was the Kentucky Derby the place to protest? I understand these things need to be said anywhere possible, but the KD? With no fans there? With limited staff? With fewer fans tuning in than say basketball?

    Am I missing something here?

  • Aug 30, 2020 06:30 PM
    Last: 18d
    359

    The Tour de France is finally underway after recent events caused it to postpone it's initial dates of June 27th through July 19th. The race has now officially begun and is running from August 30th through September 20th. With everything that's been going on recently you'd expect there to be some pretty heavy changes happening for the competitors, staff and viewers.

    Not only are there much fewer fans allowed to spectate in person, but those that are there are only allowed in certain areas and must stay a certain distance from each other. Also much like with the NBA and other sports, the Tour de France is in somewhat of a bubble. Another major change this year is that all 176 riders and staff have daily health screenings and mandatory daily testing from a mobile lab. The main point of note here is that if two or more people test positive on any team, that entire team will be removed from the race.

    This has come with a bit of controversy, as some of the riders have already had this happen. The main issue here is the UCI (governing body for the Tour de France) originally had rules allowing the organizers themselves to decide whether an entire team gets removed or not. Now the French authorities stepped in and changed it to the 2-or-more rule. This lead to some issues such as the four members of the Belgium Lotto-Soudal team testing positive and were removed after "non-negative" tests. Though the entire team didn't get sent home (yet) due to the changes hadn't been implemented by French authorities at that point.

    Although I hate to say it, I think it's a decent decision to expel a team that has two positive tests. Those two people can spread whatever they have like wildfire. There's just no way to guarantee that it doesn't reach other staff members or the riders themselves. It's bittersweet, but I think it's the right call. On the other hand, it would be a shame to send people home for faulty tests or those that were not affected at all.

  • Aug 20, 2020 05:29 PM
    Last: 24d
    152
    Dallasite Wrote: Double practice too. They get to practice the game and practice how to live in a bubble. Which, who knows, might be what they have to do next season. So its good to have the protocol down and work out all the kinks during the off season.

    I think they'll continue the bubbles on through next season. They're investing way too much money into these bubbles to not use them beyond this season alone. I'm interested to see what direction they go and how they apply all these changes going forward.

  • Aug 21, 2020 04:47 PM
    Last: 27d
    199
    Dallasite Wrote: Seems a matter of time before Arrowhead Stadium and the Chiefs nickname get replaced. I really don't know that 'arrowhead' is culturally appropriating or disrespectful to any meaningful degree, but I would understand if it was replaced anyways, just to be on the safe side. Probably will change to some corporation sponsor name, which I never like. I would rather them come up with a new name for the stadium, and not call it Dunkin Donuts Arena, or whatever.

    I have a feeling that most of these changes will happen this year. There's just way too much going on that these teams don't want the extra heat being brought down upon them. One mistake or saying something derogatory in response to people wanting their name changed can lead to some pretty heavy stuff right now.

    It's best they get out ahead of it and do the right thing. Just change the names.

  • Aug 23, 2020 10:15 PM
    Last: 18d
    335
    Dallasite Wrote:

    Here's highlights of the game. Was really an amazing game to go back and watch in full. So many ups and downs. The Clippers are thought of as one of if not the very best in the league, and they played really well. The Mavs just outplayed them when it mattered. For everyone that says the Mavs aren't ready yet, just watch this game and think twice.

    The Mavs are probably my favorite NBA team. It's hard to think of them as anything other than ready. And this was an excellent game. It's always fun to watch a straight up entertaining game, no matter who wins or loses. I care that they play and we get to see a good game.

  • Aug 23, 2020 12:03 PM
    Last: 27d
    367
    Dallasite Wrote: Just caught the highlights as I was too into the Mavs game to watch in full. But glad Sato got his 2nd win, even though he was robbed of getting the classic finish that I'm sure he really wanted; you don't really ever want to win any race, especially the Indy 500 under caution.

    Yeah I could see why finishing under caution would be a tiny stain on a win. Though if it were me, I think I'd be just fine with it. A win is a win, especially in pro sports.

  • Aug 23, 2020 12:03 PM
    Last: 27d
    367

    The 104th running of the Indianapolis 500 is set to begin today (August 23) at 1pm. And even though there won't be thousands of fans in the stands for this one, I think this year's race will be as entertaining as ever. It's really interesting to me to see how the sports world is adapting to our current situation. Everyone is just kind of making it work. NASCAR is known for it's tailgating party atmosphere, both before and after the game and this year makes that impossible. With that being said, just because there won't be fans at the race doesn't mean there won't be some of the usual shows and entertainment.

    Roger Penske has said, "It is disappointing to run the event without all of you here, but I know our drivers are determined and ready to put on a world-class show for everyone watching at home."

    I saw ratings for the qualifying events were up by around 25% and that the race itself is expecting huge numbers this year due to everyone that would normally be watching in person watching from home. I also saw that Mayo clinic physicians, Dr. Elvis Francois and Dr. William Robinson will be performing the national anthem in support of our first responders. This is really cool. I'm curious to see how they do.

    Even though this year's Indy 500 won't be like any year before, I'm excited to see how it goes and hope for a good race!