Displaying 6 Forum Posts 
  • Feb 13, 2018 06:44 PM
    Last: 3mo
    1.9k

    Honestly, I don't know. Maybe to capitalize on the female driver novelty, but having had several female drivers before her, I don't really see a novelty aspect. Patty Moise, Shawna Robinson were both fairly recent drivers that got as high as Xfinity and I believe one of them got at least one Cup start. Don't take that as Gospel though, my memory isn't quite as good as it use to be. Honestly, I don't know why they bumped her up so quickly. They certainly didn't do her a favor by doing it!

  • Apr 01, 2018 06:09 PM
    Last: 4mo
    276
    Thank you PowerPlay. Happy Hope you had a Happy Easter.
  • Feb 13, 2018 06:53 PM
    Last: 3mo
    1.8k

    It was a great moment, one of the best of all time. Everyone was happy for Dale winning the Daytona 500, simply because he had tried for 20 years and had come so close, so many times, only to have something happen to keep him out of victory lane. It was a sight to see, the entire pit road, every crew member from every team, as well as every NASCAR Official line up to congratulate him on his win.

    My personal best, was the 1976 Daytona 500. The race long dual between Richard Petty and David Pearson. The finish of that race was UNREAL! They fought the entire race, on the last lap, Pearson drafted past Petty going down the back stretch. As they came out of the 4th turn, Petty attempted to slingshot back around Pearson, but misjudged, clipping Person's front fender and sending both cars spinning and into the front straight wall. They slid down the front straight, headed toward the start-finish line, Petty ahead of Pearson and it appeared that Petty would slide across the line first and win. But both cars stopped short of the line, in the infield grass, Petty, about 300 yards from the start-finish line, with Pearson several yards further back. Petty's car had stalled, He tried to get it started. His crew came running out to try and push him toward the start-finish line. You could clearly see Petty frantically trying to wave them off, because he knew that as soon as one of them touched the car, Petty would be disqualified, as NASCAR rules stated that no car can receive any form of help/assistance on the last lap. Pearson had depressed the clutch of his car and had kept the engine running. He slipped the car back into gear and slowly started to move toward the line. Slowly he eased his car back up onto the racing surface, past the stalled car of Richard Petty. The front end of the car was badly damaged, the front bumper dragged the track, sparks flying. Pearson crossed the start-finish line, moving about 25 mph, and won the Daytona 500. I was sitting in the front stretch grandstands, where Petty and Pearson hit the wall, saw the whole thing close-up. To this day, that was the greatest, most memorial Daytona 500, as well as the greatest race that I have ever seen.

  • Feb 13, 2018 06:44 PM
    Last: 3mo
    1.9k

    Honestly, I do not think that her retirement will have a negative or detrimental effect on future female drivers. I believe she had a very positive effect for them, opened doors that may have taken allot longer to open, had she not been in racing. This was due more to her popularity and her name recognition, than her talent.

    I believe her inability to attract another sponsor was a combination of things. GoDaddy was with her from the beginning and they would have stayed with her, I believe, had they not had the change of ownership. But a couple of things worked against her, attracting a new sponsor. One, due to the economy and it's VERY SLOW recovery, sponsors became far harder to find (still a problem) as they just didn't/don't have the cash flow that they had in better days. Full season sponsorships seem to be a thing of the past, unless there is a tremendous recovery. So that is not specific to her, everyone else is having that same problem, even the TOP drivers and teams in the series -- witness Jimmie Johnson, a 7 time Series Champion, that just lost Lowes Sponsorship.

    Another thing that worked against her. She did not produce the results. She was in top equipment, but did not produce as she should have, witness, Aric Armirola, he has already shown better results in the same car, this season. I do not believe that it is because NASCAR is still a "good old boy's club. She was a good driver. The problem was that she came from the wrong racing background, the WORST background to come from, to be successful in stock car racing. She came from forms of racing (road-racing and open-wheel formula car) that have little to no transfer skills that can apply to stock car racing. In fact, everything that she learned, worked/works exactly the opposite of the way things work in a stock car. The problem was compounded by the fact that she spent practically no time in the Xfinity Series, even though listed as running a season there, in reality, she only ran a handful of races, then the next season, she went directly into the Cup Series, in one of the top team's equipment. She WAS NOT ready for that jump, did not have the experience in stock cars. She should have been running every K&N Series race that she could, as well as running Xfinity and ARCA Series races, to learn how to drive a stock car. She needed to learn the "feel of the pant's" on how the car handles, how to set up a stock car and how to communicate what the car was doing to the crew chief. She did not have that and it SHOWED! She should have run what I said above for at least a full season, before she went to the Cup Series. Her lack of seat time in stock car series below the Cup level pretty much doomed her to being a mid-pack driver. That is nothing against her, just the circumstances that she faced, due to the lack of experience.

    Back to the topic question, her retirement is not detrimental to future female racers. Presently, there are several young female drivers working their way up the ranks in the K&N Series and one, a rookie, in the ARCA Series, that looks to be a future star. They should do well in the future and likely will do allot better than Danica Patrick did in NASCAR, simply because they are coming up in the proper background, that will lead to success in stock cars. They are learning the basic skills that Danica never developed. But, her being NASCAR, none the less did help open the door for these young female drivers.

  • Apr 01, 2018 06:09 PM
    Last: 4mo
    276
    Thank you Dallasite. Happy Happy Easter to you.
  • Apr 01, 2018 06:09 PM
    Last: 4mo
    276
    Greetings Everyone. I'm new here. Just joined. I am a HUGE stock car racing fan, NASCAR and other stock car racing series. Looking forward to discussing racing with Y'all.